+44 (0)114 215 9667 mellanbycentre@sheffield.ac.uk

Dr Shelly Lawson

Lecturer in Bone and Cancer Biology, University of Sheffield

‘The use of novel-bone targeted therapies to treat multiple myeloma’

Telephone: +44 (0) 114 2159054
Email: m.a.lawson@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Dr Shelly Lawson is a Lecturer in the Department of Oncology and Metabolism at the University of Sheffield and is the co-lead of the Sheffield Myeloma Research Team (SMaRT). She is also a committee member of the Bone Research Society and is the organiser of their “Basic course in bone and cartilage biology and disease” held at the University of Sheffield every 2 years. In addition, she is member of the International Bone and Mineral Society and the Cancer and Bone Society.

Her main research interests are targeting dormant myeloma cells in bone and developing better treatments to repair myeloma-induced bone disease. Over the last 10 years she has established several preclinical murine models of myeloma and developed a novel multiphoton microscopy technique to visualise single dormant cancer cells inside bone. This has led to an increased understanding of the role of the bone microenvironment in myeloma and how it influences tumour growth. More recently her work has focussed on therapeutic agents that can repair myeloma-induced bone disease.

She is currently investigating the use of bisphosphonates as drug carriers to target anti-myeloma therapies to bone. This work could potentially lead to significant patient benefit by increasing drug specificity and effectiveness, as well as reducing drug dosage and any side effects.

Dr Lawson is also involved with number of collaborative research projects which include the use of oncolytic viral therapy (Fiona Errington-Mais, University of Leeds), drug redeployment (Farhat Khanim, University of Birmingham), the role of PADI2 (Daniel Tennant, University of Birmingham), E3 Ligase inhibition (Lisa Crawford, Queens University, Belfast), BMP signalling (Claire Edwards, University of Oxford) and targeting drug resistance in myeloma (Udo Opperman, University of Oxford). Since 2012 she has been awarded over £2M in research funding.

View Shelly’s academic profile